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Neural mechanisms of oxytocin receptor gene mediating anxiety-related temperament
Wang, Junping1; Qin, Wen1; Liu, Bing2; Zhou, Yuan3; Wang, Dawei1; Zhang, Yunting1; Jiang, Tianzi2; Yu, Chunshui1,4
Source PublicationBRAIN STRUCTURE & FUNCTION
2014-09-01
Volume219Issue:5Pages:1543-1554
SubtypeArticle
AbstractA common variant (rs53576) of the OXTR gene has been implicated in a number of socio-emotional phenotypes, such as anxiety-related behavior. Previous studies have demonstrated that A-allele carriers have higher levels of physiological and dispositional stress reactivity and depressive symptomatology compared to those with the GG genotype, but the mediating neural mechanisms remain poorly understood. We combined voxel-based morphometry and resting-state functional connectivity analyses in a large cohort of healthy young Chinese Han individuals to test the hypothesis that the OXTR gene polymorphism influences an anxiety-related temperamental trait, as assessed by the harm avoidance subscale from the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire via modulating the gray matter volume and resting-state functional connectivity of the brain, especially the limbic system. We revealed that female subjects with the AA genotype showed increased harm avoidance scores relative to G-carrier females. We also found that, compared to female individuals with the GG/GA genotype, female individuals with the AA genotype exhibited significantly smaller amygdala volumes bilaterally (especially the centromedial subregion), with a trend of allele-load-dependence. Compared to female individuals with the GG/GA genotype, female subjects with the AA genotype demonstrated reduced resting-state functional coupling between the prefrontal cortex and amygdala bilaterally, also with an allele-load-dependent trend. Furthermore, the magnitude of prefrontal-amygdala coupling in the left hemisphere was positively correlated with harm avoidance scores in female subjects. Our findings highlight a possible neural pathway by which a naturally occurring variation of the OXTR gene may affect an anxiety-related temperamental trait in female subjects by modulating prefrontal-amygdala functional connectivity.
KeywordAmygdala Anxiety Imaging Genetics Oxytocin Receptor Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
WOS HeadingsScience & Technology ; Life Sciences & Biomedicine
WOS KeywordMAJOR DEPRESSION ; HARM-AVOIDANCE ; INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES ; PERSONALITY-TRAITS ; PREFRONTAL CORTEX ; SOCIAL COGNITION ; AMYGDALA ; OXTR ; HUMANS ; VASOPRESSIN
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
WOS Research AreaAnatomy & Morphology ; Neurosciences & Neurology
WOS SubjectAnatomy & Morphology ; Neurosciences
WOS IDWOS:000341375500003
Citation statistics
Cited Times:37[WOS]   [WOS Record]     [Related Records in WOS]
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.ia.ac.cn/handle/173211/3190
Collection脑网络组研究中心
Affiliation1.Tianjin Med Univ, Gen Hosp, Dept Radiol, Tianjin 300052, Peoples R China
2.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Automat, LIAMA Ctr Computat Med, Natl Lab Pattern Recognit, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China
3.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Psychol, Ctr Social & Econ Behav, Beijing, Peoples R China
4.Tianjin Med Univ, Sch Med Imaging, Tianjin, Peoples R China
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Wang, Junping,Qin, Wen,Liu, Bing,et al. Neural mechanisms of oxytocin receptor gene mediating anxiety-related temperament[J]. BRAIN STRUCTURE & FUNCTION,2014,219(5):1543-1554.
APA Wang, Junping.,Qin, Wen.,Liu, Bing.,Zhou, Yuan.,Wang, Dawei.,...&Yu, Chunshui.(2014).Neural mechanisms of oxytocin receptor gene mediating anxiety-related temperament.BRAIN STRUCTURE & FUNCTION,219(5),1543-1554.
MLA Wang, Junping,et al."Neural mechanisms of oxytocin receptor gene mediating anxiety-related temperament".BRAIN STRUCTURE & FUNCTION 219.5(2014):1543-1554.
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