CASIA OpenIR  > 中国科学院分子影像重点实验室
Food Addiction and Neuroimaging
Zhang, Yi1,2; von Deneen, Karen M.1,2; Tian, Jie2,3; Gold, Mark S.1; Liu, Yijun1
Source PublicationCURRENT PHARMACEUTICAL DESIGN
2011-04-01
Volume17Issue:12Pages:1149-1157
SubtypeReview
AbstractObesity has become a serious epidemic and one of the leading global health problems. However, much of the current debate has been fractious, and etiologies of obesity have been attributed to eating behavior (i.e. fast food consumption), personality, depression, addiction or genetics. One of the interesting new hypotheses for explaining the development of obesity involves a food addiction model, which suggests that food is not eaten as much for survival as pleasure and that hedonic overeating is relevant to both substance-related disorders and eating disorders. Accumulating evidence has shown that there are a number of shared neural and hormonal pathways as well as distinct differences in these pathways that may help researchers discover why certain individuals continue to overeat despite health and other consequences, and becomes more and more obese. Functional neuroimaging studies have further revealed that pleasant smelling, looking, and tasting food has reinforcing characteristics similar to drugs of abuse. Many of the brain changes reported for hedonic eating and obesity are also seen in various types of addictions. Most importantly, overeating and obesity may have an acquired drive similar to drug addiction with respect to motivation and incentive craving. In both cases, the desire and continued satisfaction occur after early and repeated exposure to stimuli. The acquired drive for eating food and relative weakness of the satiety signal would cause an imbalance between the drive and hunger/reward centers in the brain and their regulation. In the current paper, we first provide a summary of literature on food addition from eight different perspectives, and then we proposed a research paradigm that may allow screening of new pharmacological treatment on the basis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).
KeywordObesity Overeating Dopamine Food Addiction Pharmacological Treatment Development Reinforcement Neuroimaging
WOS HeadingsScience & Technology ; Life Sciences & Biomedicine
WOS KeywordPRADER-WILLI-SYNDROME ; ORBITOFRONTAL CORTEX ; BRAIN DOPAMINE ; HUMAN AMYGDALA ; APPETITIVE BEHAVIOR ; METABOLIC SYNDROME ; ANGELMAN-SYNDROMES ; FEEDING-BEHAVIOR ; DORSAL STRIATUM ; DRUG-ADDICTION
Indexed BySCI
Language英语
WOS Research AreaPharmacology & Pharmacy
WOS SubjectPharmacology & Pharmacy
WOS IDWOS:000290950800007
Citation statistics
Cited Times:18[WOS]   [WOS Record]     [Related Records in WOS]
Document Type期刊论文
Identifierhttp://ir.ia.ac.cn/handle/173211/3940
Collection中国科学院分子影像重点实验室
Corresponding AuthorLiu, Yijun
Affiliation1.Univ Florida, Dept Psychiat, McKnight Brain Inst, Gainesville, FL 32610 USA
2.Xidian Univ, Sch Life Sci & Technol, Life Sci Res Ctr, Xian 710071, Shaanxi, Peoples R China
3.Chinese Acad Sci, Inst Automat, Beijing 100190, Peoples R China
Recommended Citation
GB/T 7714
Zhang, Yi,von Deneen, Karen M.,Tian, Jie,et al. Food Addiction and Neuroimaging[J]. CURRENT PHARMACEUTICAL DESIGN,2011,17(12):1149-1157.
APA Zhang, Yi,von Deneen, Karen M.,Tian, Jie,Gold, Mark S.,&Liu, Yijun.(2011).Food Addiction and Neuroimaging.CURRENT PHARMACEUTICAL DESIGN,17(12),1149-1157.
MLA Zhang, Yi,et al."Food Addiction and Neuroimaging".CURRENT PHARMACEUTICAL DESIGN 17.12(2011):1149-1157.
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